Conquer Brain Cancer

By Dr Ajay Reddy
June 8, 2021

Every year on June 8th, World Brain Tumor Day is celebrated. The German Brain Tumor Association initiated this campaign, which is now celebrated globally to raise awareness and educate people about brain tumors. There are many misconceptions and myths concerning brain tumors among the general public, so we'll use this chance to clarify some of them.

Working with your medical team to establish the best course of therapy for you is critical. In India, the rate of Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors varies between 5 and 10 per 100,000 people.

Tumors in the brain are different from tumors in other parts of the body. Because of the skull, there isn't much area for it to expand. This means that a developing tumor can suffocate important brain areas, causing major health consequences. Knowing the signs and symptoms of a brain tumor might help you decide whether it's time to see a doctor.
 
Where Brain Cancers Start and Spread
 
A brain tumor is a mass or an abnormal cell growth inside the brain. There are different types of brain tumors. Some of the brain tumors are noncancerous (benign), and others are cancerous (malignant).
 
Primary brain tumors start in the brain and tend to stay there
Secondary brain tumors are more prevalent than primary brain tumors. These tumors begin elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain. Lung cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, colon cancer, and skin cancer are some of the most common tumors that spread to the brain.
 
Symptoms of Brain Tumor
 
The symptoms of brain tumors differ depending on the type and location of the tumor. Because different parts of the brain govern different bodily activities, the location of the tumor has an impact on the symptoms you experience.
 
Some tumors are asymptomatic until they reach a certain size, at which point they cause a serious and quick deterioration in health. Other cancers may have slow-developing symptoms.
 
Headaches may not get better with the usual headache remedies. Here are some common symptoms:
 
Seizures
Changes in speech or hearing
Changes in vision
Balance problems
Problems with walking
Numbness or tingling in the arms or legs
Problems with memory
Personality changes
Inability to concentrate
Weakness in one part of the body
Morning vomiting without nausea
 
How Brain Cancer Is Treated
 
The treatment depends on the type and grade of cancer, where it's located, its size, age, and health of the patient.
 
Surgery is usually the first way to proceed to treatment. For grade 1 tumors (cancer cell grows slowly), surgery may be enough. It is possible that cancer can be removed. But even if it isn’t, the surgery can reduce the size and ease symptoms.
 
Postoperative, radiation therapy is performed to eliminate any remaining tumor cells. If surgery is not an option, radiation therapy may be your only alternative.
 
Chemotherapy is sometimes used to eliminate cancer cells in the brain. It's given by mouth, IV, or, less often, wafers implanted in the brain by a surgeon.
 
Certain types of brain tumors can be treated with targeted therapy. These drugs target specific components of cancer cells and help in the prevention of tumor growth and dissemination.
 
Your doctor may also recommend combined therapies.
 
If you have cancer, it's important to stick to your treatment plan, work with your doctor, and attend all of your scheduled appointments.

 

By Dr. Ajay Reddy is a Consultant (Neuro Oncology) at American Oncology Institute
 

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By Dr Ajay Reddy
June 8,2021

Every year on June 8th, World Brain Tumor Day is celebrated. The German Brain Tumor Association initiated this campaign, which is now celebrated globally to raise awareness and educate people about brain tumors. There are many misconceptions and myths concerning brain tumors among the general public, so we'll use this chance to clarify some of them.

Working with your medical team to establish the best course of therapy for you is critical. In India, the rate of Central Nervous System (CNS) tumors varies between 5 and 10 per 100,000 people.

Tumors in the brain are different from tumors in other parts of the body. Because of the skull, there isn't much area for it to expand. This means that a developing tumor can suffocate important brain areas, causing major health consequences. Knowing the signs and symptoms of a brain tumor might help you decide whether it's time to see a doctor.
 
Where Brain Cancers Start and Spread
 
A brain tumor is a mass or an abnormal cell growth inside the brain. There are different types of brain tumors. Some of the brain tumors are noncancerous (benign), and others are cancerous (malignant).
 
Primary brain tumors start in the brain and tend to stay there
Secondary brain tumors are more prevalent than primary brain tumors. These tumors begin elsewhere in the body and spread to the brain. Lung cancer, breast cancer, kidney cancer, colon cancer, and skin cancer are some of the most common tumors that spread to the brain.
 
Symptoms of Brain Tumor
 
The symptoms of brain tumors differ depending on the type and location of the tumor. Because different parts of the brain govern different bodily activities, the location of the tumor has an impact on the symptoms you experience.
 
Some tumors are asymptomatic until they reach a certain size, at which point they cause a serious and quick deterioration in health. Other cancers may have slow-developing symptoms.
 
Headaches may not get better with the usual headache remedies. Here are some common symptoms:
 
Seizures
Changes in speech or hearing
Changes in vision
Balance problems
Problems with walking
Numbness or tingling in the arms or legs
Problems with memory
Personality changes
Inability to concentrate
Weakness in one part of the body
Morning vomiting without nausea
 
How Brain Cancer Is Treated
 
The treatment depends on the type and grade of cancer, where it's located, its size, age, and health of the patient.
 
Surgery is usually the first way to proceed to treatment. For grade 1 tumors (cancer cell grows slowly), surgery may be enough. It is possible that cancer can be removed. But even if it isn’t, the surgery can reduce the size and ease symptoms.
 
Postoperative, radiation therapy is performed to eliminate any remaining tumor cells. If surgery is not an option, radiation therapy may be your only alternative.
 
Chemotherapy is sometimes used to eliminate cancer cells in the brain. It's given by mouth, IV, or, less often, wafers implanted in the brain by a surgeon.
 
Certain types of brain tumors can be treated with targeted therapy. These drugs target specific components of cancer cells and help in the prevention of tumor growth and dissemination.
 
Your doctor may also recommend combined therapies.
 
If you have cancer, it's important to stick to your treatment plan, work with your doctor, and attend all of your scheduled appointments.

 

By Dr. Ajay Reddy is a Consultant (Neuro Oncology) at American Oncology Institute
 

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News Network
June 2,2021

United Nations, June 2: The World Health Organisation (WHO) has said only B.1.617.2, one of the three strains of the B.1.617 Covid-19 variant first detected in India, is a “variant of concern” now and noted that lower rates of transmission have been observed for the other two lineages.

The B.1.617 variant was first detected in India and was divided in three lineages - B.1.617.1, B.1.617.2 and B.1.617.3.

In the Covid-19 Weekly Epidemiological Update published on Tuesday, WHO said available findings for lineages B.1.617.1 and B.1.617.2 were initially used to designate B.1.617 a global Variant of Concern (VOC) on May 11 this year.

“Since then, it has become evident that greater public health risks are currently associated with B.1.617.2, while lower rates of transmission of other lineages have been observed,” WHO said.

The UN health agency said that in order to reflect this updated information, B.1.617 has been “delineated”.

“B.1.617.2 remains a VOC and labelled variant Delta – we continue to observe significantly increased transmissibility and a growing number of countries reporting outbreaks associated with this variant. Further studies into the impact of this variant remain a high priority for WHO.”

The Delta variant has now been reported in 62 countries around the world as of June 1, the update said.

It added that the B.1.617.1 strain has been reclassified to a Variant of Interest (VOI) and labelled variant “Kappa”. While Kappa is also demonstrating increased transmissibility (in specified locations), “global prevalence appears to be declining. This variant will continue to be monitored and reassessed regularly.”

The B.1.617.3 lineage is "no longer classified as either a VOI or VOC – relatively few reports of this variant have been submitted to date.”

On Monday, the WHO announced the new naming system for key Covid-19 variants and the labels are based on the Greek alphabet (i.e. Alpha, Beta, Gamma, etc), “making them simple, easy to say and remember.”

“The labels do not replace existing scientific names, which convey important scientific information & will continue to be used in research. The naming system aims to prevent calling #COVID19 variants by the places where they are detected, which is stigmatising & discriminatory,” WHO said in a tweet.

WHO said that as the global public health risks posed by specific Covid-19 variants becomes better understood and evolves, it will continue to update the list of global VOIs and VOCs.

“This is necessary to adjust to the emergence of new variants, their changing epidemiology (e.g., the incidence of some variants is rapidly declining), and our understanding of their phenotypic impacts as new evidence becomes available and is shared.”

Variants no longer classified as VOCs or VOIs will continue to be monitored as part of the overall evolution of SARS-CoV-2, and may be reassessed pending new evidence indicating an increased public health risk, WHO said.

The update further said that India reported the highest numbers of new Covid-19 cases in the past week at 13,64,668, a 26 per cent decrease compared to the previous week. Other countries reporting the highest numbers of new cases are Brazil (4,20,981 new cases; 7 per cent decrease), Argentina (2,19,910 new cases; 3 per cent increase), the United States of America (1,53,587 new cases; 18 per cent decrease), and Colombia (1,50,517 new cases; 40 per cent increase).

The South-East Asia Region reported over 1.5 million new cases and over 29,000 new deaths, a 24 per cent and an 8 per cent decrease respectively compared to the previous week.

“Case incidence continued to follow a sharp decline for a third consecutive week, and death incidence decreased for the first time since early March 2021, primarily driven by trends reported in India,” the update said.

In the South-East Asia Region, the highest numbers of new deaths were reported from India (26,706 new deaths; 1.9 new deaths per 100,000; an 8 per cent decrease), Indonesia (1057 new deaths; 0.4 new deaths per 100,000; a 15 per cent decrease), and Nepal (1010 new deaths; 3.5 new deaths per 100,000; a 22 per cent decrease).

Globally, the number of new Covid-19 cases and deaths continues to decrease, with over 3.5 million new cases and 78,000 new deaths reported globally in the past week; a 15 per cent and 7 per cent decrease respectively, compared to the previous week, the update said.

The European and South-East Asia Regions reported the largest decline in new cases and deaths in the past week, while case incidence increased in the African and Western Pacific regions. “Although the number of global cases and deaths continued to decrease for a fifth and fourth consecutive week respectively, case and death incidences remain at high levels and significant increases have been reported in many countries in all regions,” the WHO update said.

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