Dalit student dies after brutal punishment by ‘upper caste’ teacher for touching water pot

News Network
August 14, 2022

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A nine-year-old Dalit boy, a student of a private school in Rajasthan's Surana village died on Saturday, August 13, days after he was brutally beaten by his school teacher for touching a drinking water pot.

40-year-old teacher Chail Singh, an upper caste Hindu, who allegedly beat the boy has been arrested and charged with murder and under sections of the Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe (Prevention of Atrocities) Act.

Police said the reason for beating up the Class 3 student Indra Meghwal that he touched a drinking water pot is being investigated.

The incident took place on July 20, the victim's father said. The boy suffered a serious injury to his face and became unconscious after receiving the beating. The boy was taken to the district hospital from where he was referred to a hospital in Udaipur. But even after a week, there was no improvement. The family decided to take him to Ahmedabad where he succumbed to the injuries. The photo of the boy with swollen eyes and an injured nose has surfaced on social media.

"He remained admitted at the hospital in Udaipur for about a week, but seeing no improvement, we took him to Ahmedabad. But his condition did not improve even there and he finally succumbed on Saturday," the boy's father Devaram Meghwal said.

The state education department has initiated an inquiry into the incident. Two officials have been asked to submit a report to the block education officer.

Rajasthan chief minister Ashok Gehlot said the incident is tragic and the state government will ensure that the victim's family gets justice at the earliest. The CM has also announced an assistance of ₹5 lakh to the family of the deceased.

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News Network
October 2,2022

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New Delhi, Oct 2: India is likely to add nearly 80 airports in the next four to five years, the aviation regulator has said. However, aerodromes need to fulfil certain requirements to start the operation of flights.

In the last eight years, the number of airports in the country has increased from 74 to 141, and as per the Ministry of Civil Aviation, this will grow up to 220 in the next four to five years.

The Civil Aviation Ministry has given 'in-principle' approval for setting up of 21 greenfield airports across the country, including Mopa in Goa; Navi Mumbai, Shirdi and Sindhudurg in Maharashtra; Kalaburagi, Vijayapura, Hassan and Shivamogga in Karnataka; Dabra in Madhya Pradesh; Kushinagar and Noida (Jewar) in Uttar Pradesh; Dholera and Hirasar (Rajkot) in Gujarat; Karaikal in Puducherry; Dagadarthi (Nellore), Bhogapuram and Orvakal (Kurnool) in Andhra Pradesh; Durgapur in West Bengal; Pakyong in Sikkim; Kannur in Kerala; and Hollongi (Itanagar) in Arunachal Pradesh.

So far, eight greenfield airports -- namely Durgapur, Shirdi, Sindhudurg, Pakyong, Kannur, Kalaburagi, Orvakal and Kushinagar -- have been operationalised.

As per the Aviation Ministry, in the financial year 2022-23, the Centre has granted site clearance to the Himachal Pradesh government for development of a new greenfield airport at Nagchala, Mandi. Besides, 35 airports, helipads and water aerodromes are targeted for development during FY 2022-23 under RCS-UDAN.

An official said that for safety purposes, an aerodrome needs to meet the specifications regarding its management systems, operational procedures, physical characteristics, assessment and treatment of obstacles, visual aids, rescue and fire-fighting services, as per the DGCA CAR (Civil Aviation Requirement).

While these guidelines are for the licensing of the aerodrome from the technical point of view, the licence for operation of airports is granted by the Central government as per the Civil Aviation policy.

As far as site clearance for a greenfield airport for public use is concerned, prior to commencing the construction, the owner or developer of the greenfield aerodrome will have to file applications to the steering committee at the Ministry of Civil Aviation.

The request for site approval and issuance of in-principle approval in respect of these aerodromes will be dealt by the concerned department in the Ministry as per the greenfield airport policy.

Licence for the aerodromes is given in two categories, including for private use and for public use and usage of private use aerodromes excludes the operation of scheduled flights.

For the public use category, the Ministry of Civil Aviation will grant site clearance and 'in-principle' approval for all proposals as per the greenfield airport policy.

On the other hand, for the private use category, site clearance as well as 'in-principle' approval will be granted by the regulator as per technical assessment of the site and based on usage of the airport.

The 'in-principle' approval granted by DGCA indicates that the proposed airport is essentially meant for non-commercial operations by the licensee and by individuals specifically authorised by the licensee only, said the DGCA, as per the new guidelines.

Explaining the procedure for converting the usage of airports, the guidelines said that the government approvals as per the prevailing policy will be required for this.

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News Network
September 29,2022

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Twitter has ‘withheld’ the official Popular Front of India account a day after the government of India banned the organisation for a period of five years under the provisions of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act. Facebook and Instagram, too, withheld the official accounts of the organisation.

On Twitter, where the organisation had over 80,000 followers, it showed that the account had been withheld in India following a legal demand. A similar notice was seen on the accounts of its chairperson OMA Salam and general secretary Anis Ahmed.

On Wednesday, after invoking the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act to effect the ban, the Ministry of Home Affairs said that the PFI and its affiliates are linked to terror groups like the ISIS, propagate “anti-national sentiments… radicalise a particular section of society with the intention to create disaffection” and constitute a “major threat to internal security of the country”.

Saying it was “necessary to curb the nefarious activities” of the organisation, the MHA declared the PFI an “unlawful association” along with “its associates or affiliates or fronts including Rehab India Foundation (RIF), Campus Front of India (CFI), All India Imams Council (AIIC), National Confederation of Human Rights Organisation (NCHRO), National Women’s Front, Junior Front, Empower India Foundation and Rehab Foundation, Kerala”.

Within hours of the ban, the PFI announced it had disbanded. PFI Kerala general secretary A Abdul Sattar said, “As law-abiding citizens of the country, we accept the decision of the Home Ministry.’’

According to a document of the Home Ministry, the ban came in the wake of over 1,300 criminal cases registered across the country by law enforcement agencies against PFI members. These include offences related to the killing of leaders associated with hardline Hindutva organisations, organising suspected terror camps, alleged radicalisation of youth and links with foreign terrorist organisations such as the Islamic State.

The central government also directed all states and Union Territories to use their power under the UAPA against the PFI and its ‘affiliates’. 

The central government notification also declared Rehab India Foundation, Campus Front of India, All India Imams Council, National Confederation of Human Rights Organization, National Women’s Front, Junior Front, Empower India Foundation and Rehab Foundation, Kerala, as an ‘unlawful association’ under sub-section (1) of section 3 of the UAPA.

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News Network
September 30,2022

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Kabul, Sept 30: A suicide bombing at a learning center in the Afghan capital Kabul killed at least 19 people on Friday morning, police spokesman Khalid Zadran said.

“Students were preparing for an exam when a suicide bomber struck at this educational center. Unfortunately, 19 people have been martyred and 27 others wounded,” Zadran said.

The blast happened in the Dasht-e-Barchi neighborhood, a predominantly Shiite Muslim area in western Kabul home to the minority Hazara community, the scene of some of Afghanistan’s most deadly attacks.

“An educational center called ‘Kaj’ has been attacked, which unfortunately has caused deaths and injuries,” interior ministry spokesman Abdul Nafy Takor tweeted.

“Attacking civilian targets proves the enemy’s inhuman cruelty and lack of moral standards.”

Videos posted online and photos published by local media showed bloodied victims being carried away from the scene.

The Taliban’s return to power in Afghanistan last year brought an end of the two-decade war and a significant reduction in violence, but security has begun to deteriorate in recent months under the hard-line Islamists.

Afghanistan’s Shiite Hazaras have faced persecution for decades, with the Taliban accused of abuses against the group when they first ruled from 1996 to 2001 and picking up again after they swept to power last year.

They are also the frequent target of attacks by the Taliban’s enemy the Daesh group. Both consider them heretics.

Countless attacks have devastated the area, with many targeting children, women and schools.

Last year, before the return of the Taliban, at least 85 people — mainly girl students — were killed and about 300 wounded when three bombs exploded near their school in Dasht-e-Barchi.

No group claimed responsibility, but a year earlier Daesh claimed a suicide attack on an educational center in the same area that killed 24, including students.

In May 2020, the group was blamed for a bloody gun attack on a maternity ward of a hospital in the neighborhood that killed 25 people, including new mothers.

Just months ago in April two deadly bomb blasts at separate education centers in the area killed six people and wounded at least 20 others.

Education is a flashpoint issue in Afghanistan, with the Taliban blocking many girls from returning to secondary school education, while Daesh also stand against the education of women and girls.

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