Bhagavad Gita, Upanishads, other Hindu texts part of Sanskrit syllabus of this Islamic Institute in Kerala

News Network
January 16, 2023

sanskrit.jpg

Basic Sanskrit grammar in class 11 and 12 and then Bhagavad Gita as well as other Hindu texts in the 'Deva Bhasha' in subsequent years of study is the structured syllabus prepared for its students by an Islamic institute in Kerala's Thrissur district.

The new syllabus will come into operation from June 2023 when the new academic year starts. The Academy of Sharia and Advanced Studies (ASAS) run by Malik Deenar Islamic Complex (MIC) was in the news recently for setting an example by teaching Sanskrit, also known as 'Deva Bhasha', to its students with the help of Hindu scholars. The decision, to come out with a structured syllabus to teach the ancient and classical language, was taken to inculcate in the students, knowledge and awareness about other religions, the institute said.

The MIC ASAS was teaching its students selective portions of the Bhagavad Gita, Upanishads, Mahabharata, Ramayana in Sanskrit for the last seven years. Hafiz Aboobacker, one of the coordinators at the institute, told PTI that the earlier Sanskrit syllabus was not very detailed. The latest one is a syllabus for a eight-year course starting from plus two till post graduation, he said.

The students will now also have the option to opt for a degree or post-graduate course in Sanskrit, Aboobacker said. He said the syllabus was a joint effort of Dr C M Neelakandan -- a retired professor of Sanskrit Literature from the Sree Sankaracharya University of Sanskrit -- and Dr Shamseer P C -- assistant professor, department of Sanskrit, Kerala University. The idea was not to just teach them a language, but to also familiarise students with these ancient Hindu texts so that they understand religion and can make informed decisions for themselves, he said.

"It will also help to build secular and democratic ideas among students," he said. According to the latest syllabus, in plus two, the students would be familiarised with basic grammar, words, declensions, gender, number and sentence construction in Sanskrit. After that, during the first two years of their undergraduate studies, they would be taught Mahakavya, basic grammar, Sanskrit drama, computer, Sanskrit stotra, grammar, prose and Tarkasamgraha -- a treatise in Sanskrit giving a foundational exposition of the ancient Indian system of logic and reasoning.

In the final year, Bhagavad Gita, translation and Sankhya would be taught to students, according to the syllabus shared by the institute. During post-graduation, syllabus would include Vedic Suktas, Vedantasara, Dramaturgy, Upanishads, Natyasastra, yoga, Bhasa study and Book review, it said. The institution is primarily a Sharia college where other languages, like Urdu and English are also taught besides a degree course in Arts as it is affiliated to Calicut University.

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News Network
January 16,2023

sanskrit.jpg

Basic Sanskrit grammar in class 11 and 12 and then Bhagavad Gita as well as other Hindu texts in the 'Deva Bhasha' in subsequent years of study is the structured syllabus prepared for its students by an Islamic institute in Kerala's Thrissur district.

The new syllabus will come into operation from June 2023 when the new academic year starts. The Academy of Sharia and Advanced Studies (ASAS) run by Malik Deenar Islamic Complex (MIC) was in the news recently for setting an example by teaching Sanskrit, also known as 'Deva Bhasha', to its students with the help of Hindu scholars. The decision, to come out with a structured syllabus to teach the ancient and classical language, was taken to inculcate in the students, knowledge and awareness about other religions, the institute said.

The MIC ASAS was teaching its students selective portions of the Bhagavad Gita, Upanishads, Mahabharata, Ramayana in Sanskrit for the last seven years. Hafiz Aboobacker, one of the coordinators at the institute, told PTI that the earlier Sanskrit syllabus was not very detailed. The latest one is a syllabus for a eight-year course starting from plus two till post graduation, he said.

The students will now also have the option to opt for a degree or post-graduate course in Sanskrit, Aboobacker said. He said the syllabus was a joint effort of Dr C M Neelakandan -- a retired professor of Sanskrit Literature from the Sree Sankaracharya University of Sanskrit -- and Dr Shamseer P C -- assistant professor, department of Sanskrit, Kerala University. The idea was not to just teach them a language, but to also familiarise students with these ancient Hindu texts so that they understand religion and can make informed decisions for themselves, he said.

"It will also help to build secular and democratic ideas among students," he said. According to the latest syllabus, in plus two, the students would be familiarised with basic grammar, words, declensions, gender, number and sentence construction in Sanskrit. After that, during the first two years of their undergraduate studies, they would be taught Mahakavya, basic grammar, Sanskrit drama, computer, Sanskrit stotra, grammar, prose and Tarkasamgraha -- a treatise in Sanskrit giving a foundational exposition of the ancient Indian system of logic and reasoning.

In the final year, Bhagavad Gita, translation and Sankhya would be taught to students, according to the syllabus shared by the institute. During post-graduation, syllabus would include Vedic Suktas, Vedantasara, Dramaturgy, Upanishads, Natyasastra, yoga, Bhasa study and Book review, it said. The institution is primarily a Sharia college where other languages, like Urdu and English are also taught besides a degree course in Arts as it is affiliated to Calicut University.

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News Network
January 21,2023

cloud.jpg

A rare cloud formation resembling an unidentified flying object (UFO) was spotted floating over Bursa, Turkey, on Thursday (January 19) morning. According to The Guardian, the almost circular cloud, known as a lenticular cloud, remained intact for about an hour. Several internet users captured the rare phenomena on their phones. It appeared at sunrise and featured a large hole in the middle. 

"#Turkey an unusual dawn this morning. Footage of a rare natural phenomenon called #UFO lenticular/spying foehn clouds," one user wrote while sharing images and video of the UFO-like cloud. 

"A majestic lenticular cloud spotted over Bursa, Turkey today," said another user. 

The videos and images of the bizarre-looking cloud have gone viral across the world. Hundreds of social media users said that the cloud looked like a UFO. However, Turkey's state Meteorological Serviced reportedly explained that the rare phenomenon was simply a "lenticular cloud". 

According to The Guardian, lenticular clouds are known for their curved, flying saucer-like appearance. They are usually found at heights between 2,000 and 5,000 meters. 

As per Fox News, lenticular clouds are formed when the layer of the atmosphere is just on the cusp of saturation, meaning they are formed as a result of strong wind fluctuations over hills and mountains when the air is stable and moist. They most often form in winter, but it is still possible to see them at other times of the year. 

These types of clouds can be a signal of precipitation within the next day or so as the atmosphere moistens ahead of the incoming storm. 

In this case, a weak cold front was approaching western Turkey on Thursday. Bursa also lies at the base of a mountain range, which makes the phenomenon more likely.

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P A Hameed Padubidri
January 26,2023

Rday.jpg

India and Indian diaspora across the world are once again celebrating the Republic Day commemorating the date on which the Constitution of India, described as one of the largest constitutions in the world, came into effect. 

The real spirit and ethos of the India's independence became visible when the full-fledged constitution of India came into existence in January 26, 1950. 

India's capital-Delhi-takes vibrant colours with the display and reverberation of national flags and songs on each and every street and avenue, demo of military parade, exhibition of the Indian cultural vibes and various programs. 

We can describe this national day as an embodiment of Poorna Swaraj or the complete autonomy. It's a plaque of pride to rule and to be ruled by ourselves with our own laws and rules without any play of foreign rule, say the British reign. Also, it's described as the fervent vibes of a great deal of sacrifices done by our great personalities, who shed their blood & flesh for this great country as a one family. 

Hindus, Muslims, Christians, Sikhs and others had stood as a solid wall against the British Raj and as a result, now India stood out tall with its largest democracy & constitution in the world; that makes every Indian in India and  across the globe proud of their identity & stature. Fundamental, civil rights and human rights are securely guaranteed under the provisions of this Constitution. 

This national carnival makes a special stint for the Indian diaspora living in the different parts of the world especially for those who are residing in the gulf countries and MENA regions. This makes them to stand in all the pomp and pride & to share the good message to their host countries' citizens. 

Indian Embassies, Missions & High Commissioners in their respective host countries celebrate this Republic Day by hoisting the Indian flags on the top of the roofs and by organizing various events. Interestingly, this year's Republic Day came as coincidental with the diamond jubilee year of the India's independence, which is termed as "AZADI KA AMRIT MAHOTSAV" as well as the initiation of the Indo-Saudi diplomatic relations. This brings all the pomps & prides among the NRIs especially residing in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. That too with the posting of new Ambassador,  to the KSA, Dr. Suhel Aijaz Khan, after the gap of around 9 months. 

Besides, this year's Republic Day celebrations coincides with the year of India's taking on the prestigious Presidency of G20. The tangs of all these co-incidents makes this Republic Day more meaningful and historical. 

ONE EARTH, ONE FAMILY & ONE FUTURE is the catchphrase of G20 that makes this day fervent & more spirited. 

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