Now, YouTube deletes new Trump video, suspends fresh uploads

Agencies
January 13, 2021

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Washington, Jan 13: Google-owned YouTube, which is yet to permanently ban the outgoing US President Donald Trump, has removed a new video from his account for violating the content policies. The company has also issued a "strike" against his account, meaning he cannot upload new videos or livestream content for at least a week.

"After careful review, and in light of concerns about the ongoing potential for violence, we removed new content uploaded to the Donald J. Trump channel and issued a strike for violating our policies for inciting violence." YouTube says in a statement to The Verge.

"As a result, in accordance with our long-standing strikes system, the channel is now prevented from uploading new videos or live streams for a minimum of seven days -- which may be extended," it said on Tuesday.

YouTube has also indefinitely disabled comments on Trump's videos due to "ongoing concerns about violence".

Earlier, YouTube removed one of Trump's videos that addressed a mob attack on the Capitol.

Twitter has banned Trump from its platform, citing "risk of further incitement of violence". The Twitter ban came after a pro-Trump mob stormed the US Capitol, hoping to stop the certification of Joe Biden's election victory.

Facebook initially prevented Trump from posting to Facebook and Instagram for 24 hours, before CEO Mark Zuckerberg announced to indefinitely suspend his account till January 20.

On Twitter, Trump's handle is now almost empty white canvas, frozen at 51 followed accounts, 88.7 million followers and two words on the centre of screen, saying "Account suspended".

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News Network
January 19,2021

Betul, Jan 19: A 13-year-old Dalit girl has been allegedly raped by a man who then tried to bury her alive in a pit in Madhya Pradesh's Betul district, police said on Tuesday.

The incident took place on Monday evening following which the 35-year-old accused was arrested, and the girl, whose condition is serious, has been referred to a hospital at Nagpur in neighbouring Maharashtra, they said.

The girl had gone to a farm in a village under Ghodadongri police station area to switch off a motor and on finding her alone, the accused allegedly raped her, Betul Superintendent of Police Simala Prasad said.

In a bid to hide the crime, the accused then dragged her to a drain and dumped her in a nearby pit which he covered with stones and thorny bushes, the official said.

When the girl did not return home till late evening, her parents and sister started searching for her, he said.

When her sister reached near the pit, she heard the voice of someone writhing in pain.

She immediately called her father and when they removed the bushes and stones, they found the victim inside the pit, the official said.

The family members rushed the girl to Ghodadongri Civil Hospital, from where she was taken to the district hospital, he said.

As her condition is serious, the authorities referred her to a hospital in Nagpur for treatment, the official said.

Based on a complaint lodged by the victim's family, the accused was arrested and booked under relevant sections of the IPC, the Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe (Prevention of Atrocities) Act and the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act, he said.

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News Network
January 17,2021

Oslo, Jan 17: Norwegian officials said 29 people had died in the country a short time after receiving their first dose of the Covid-19 vaccine. Of those deaths, at least 13 have been autopsied, with the results suggesting that common side effects may have contributed to severe reactions in frail, elderly people, according to the Norwegian Medicines Agency.

Norway said Covid-19 vaccines may be too risky for the very old and terminally ill, the most cautious statement yet from a European health authority as countries assess the real-world side effects of the first shots to gain approval.

“For those with the most severe frailty, even relatively mild vaccine side effects can have serious consequences,” the Norwegian Institute of Public Health said. “For those who have a very short remaining life span anyway, the benefit of the vaccine may be marginal or irrelevant.”

The recommendation does not mean younger, healthier people should avoid being vaccinated. But it’s an early indication of what to watch as countries begin to issue safety monitoring reports on the vaccines. Emer Cooke, the new head of the European Medicines Agency, has said tracking the safety of Covid vaccines, especially those relying on novel technologies such as messenger RNA, would be one of the biggest challenges once shots are rolled out widely.

Pfizer and BioNTech are working with the Norwegian regulator to investigate the deaths in Norway, Pfizer said in an e-mailed statement. The agency found that “the number of incidents so far is not alarming, and in line with expectations,” Pfizer said.

Allergic reactions have been uncommon so far. In the US, authorities reported 21 cases of severe allergic reactions from December 14-23 after administration of about 1.9 million initial doses of the vaccine developed by Pfizer Inc. and BioNTech SE. That’s an incidence of 11.1 cases per million doses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Though both Covid-19 vaccines approved so far in Europe were tested in tens of thousands of people -- including volunteers in their late 80s and 90s -- the average trial participant was in his or her early 50s. The first people to be immunized in many places have been older than that as countries rush to inoculate nursing-home residents at high risk from the virus.

Norway has given at least one dose to about 33,000 people, focusing on those considered to be most at risk if they contract the virus, including the elderly. The Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine approved late last year has been used most broadly, with a similar shot from Moderna Inc. approved earlier this month also now being administered.

Of 29 cases of potential side effects investigated by Norwegian authorities, almost three-quarters were in people age 80 or older, the regulator said in a January 14 report.

In France, one frail patient died in a care home two hours after being vaccinated, but authorities said given the patient’s previous medical history there is no indication the death was linked to the vaccine. The French pharmaceutical safety agency on Thursday reported four cases of severe allergic reactions and two incidents of irregular heartbeat after vaccination.

The first Europe-wide safety report on the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine will probably be published at the end of January, the regulator’s key medicines committee said Friday. Vaccine makers are required to submit data monthly.

In the UK, which has carried out more immunizations per capita than anywhere else in Europe, authorities will assess safety data and plan to publish details of suspected reactions “on a regular basis,” the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency said, without giving a date.

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News Network
January 10,2021

Washington, Jan 10: China and other countries in Asia like Vietnam have shown that there is a way of dealing with a pandemic even in the absence of a vaccine, allowing the economy to get back on track, according to a top IMF official.

The playbook here is the one that includes local restrictions, rapid testing, rapid tracing and seeing these measures through until the end, until localised outbreaks subside, said Hlge Berger, Mission Chief for China and Assistant Director, Asia and Pacific Department of the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

“I think China, but not only China, but other countries in Asia, look, for example, at Vietnam, have shown that there's a way of dealing with a pandemic even in the absence of a vaccine, that will allow the economy to get back, at least close to normal operating capacity by learning how to deal with local outbreaks,” Berger told reporters during a conference call.

That’s an important takeaway in a narrow sense from the experience of China that is particularly applicable to low-income countries that are facing pressures for the vaccine, he asserted.

“Other developments that I would stress have to do with digital enhancements of otherwise not online businesses; for example, in many low-income countries you do have well-developed electronic communication networks through cell phones. So, progress along these lines is helpful as well,” he said.

Vaccines, of course, are ultimately what will be needed to make sure so that all economies and the global economy gets back to normal, defined as the pre-pandemic normal, he noted.

“And here, I note that China has pledged to help facilitate the supply of vaccines to low-income countries; together with other economies, of course, it's not just China. But that is an important endeavour and at the Fund we encourage this, and we think it's important for the global economy and to help us all to overcome the pandemic, ultimately and go back to normal,” Berger added. 

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