My ties with Bin Laden started in Jeddah: Adel Batterjee

News Network
January 26, 2013

Jeddah, Jan 26: Saudi businessman Dr. Adel Batterjee, whose name was removed from the list of the Al-Qaeda Sanctions Committee recently, said he has known Osama Bin Laden for long, from the time he was in Jeddah.

“My relations with him was very good, and we moved to Afghanistan together,” Batterjee said. “Takfiri ideology was already in existence in Peshawar, but was not widespread. We fought this ideology with all our strength, in our gatherings…in our Friday sermons,” he added.

“The reason for our fight against this (ideology) was because we were keen not to lure the fighters into this wrongful thought. Bin Laden at that time was not following this creed, and I swear on this,” the Saudi businessman said in an exclusive interview with Okaz, a sister publication of Saudi Gazette.

“We went our separate ways, when Bin laden traveled to Pakistan and from there to Sudan in 1991. I did not see him after that,” Batterjee said. “Since then I've had not direct or indirect links with him.”

The Al-Qaeda Sanctions Committee list was issued following Sept. 11 attacks in the United States by the United Nations Security Council.

The Saudi businessman's name was deleted after Batterjee protested “it was unfairly put on the list” on Dec. 23, 2004.

Batterjee told Okaz/Saudi Gazette that he was surprised to see his name on the list, adding that the UN committee had not taken any measures to acquit him of the charges against him.

He submitted documentary evidence to Canadian Judge Kimberly Prost, who chaired a committee that was formed in 2010 to look into the list and decide which names should be removed. After reviewing all documents, Prost decided that Batterjee's name should be deleted from the list.

After Batterjee's name appeared on the list, the committee imposed a travel ban, froze his assets and prevented him from engaging in business activities around the world.

Comments

aliali
 - 
Tuesday, 19 Jan 2021

Batterjee has established charitable organizations in Sudan, including Al-Bir International, HAAD Organization, and finally the Doroob org.
""Batterjee's wealth and power remain intact, and so does his ideology. What is to prevent Batterjee from incorporating another organization, as he has done before, to continue funding extremism? All Batterjee needs is another acronym

ali
 - 
Friday, 8 Sep 2017

Batterjee remained active in BIF despite having officially resigned as Director, and he established another orginazation HAAD ,

 

I wonder why Batterjee are set free to finance terrorism 

 

he is big liar 

i think its the time to punish him for his crime

 

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News Network
September 18,2021

The US military has admitted killing 10 Afghan civilians, including seven children, in a drone strike last month. Washington has previously claimed that those who killed were terrorists.

The Pentagon had maintained the August 29 strike targeted a Daesh-K terrorist who posed an imminent threat to American troops at the Kabul airport, with Chairman of the US Joint Chiefs Gen. Mark Milley calling it a "righteous strike.”  

But on Friday, General Frank McKenzie, the top general of US Central Command, announced at the Pentagon that the military investigation has found it killed 10 civilians and the driver and that the vehicle targeted was not a threat associated with Daesh-K, a shadowy terrorist group that emerged following the last month bomb blast at the Kabul airport.  The attack killed scores of Afghans and over a dozen Americans.

McKenzie told reporters that the US military drone strike was a "mistake" and offered an apology.

"This strike was taken in the earnest belief that it would prevent an imminent threat to our forces and the evacuees at the airport, but it was a mistake and I offer my sincere apology," he said.

McKenzie added that he is "fully responsible for this strike and this tragic outcome."

Some media outlets had reported that the US drone strike apparently targeted the wrong man, killing an innocent Afghan aid worker along with members of his family, but the top US general described the attack as "righteous".

"At the time of the strike, I was confident that the strike had averted an imminent threat to our forces at the airport," McKenzie told reporters. "Our investigation now concludes that the strike was a tragic mistake."

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News Network
September 12,2021

Kabul, Sept 12: The higher education minister in the new Taliban government says women will study in universities, including at post-graduate levels, but that classrooms will be gender-segregated and that Islamic dress is compulsory.

The minister, Abdul Baqi Haqqani, laid out the new policies at a news conference Sunday, several days after Afghanistan's new rulers formed a Taliban government.

Haqqani said female university students would be required to wear a hijab but did not elaborate on whether this only meant a compulsory headscarf or also mandatory face coverings. 

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News Network
September 6,2021

Kabul, Sept 6: The Taliban has taken complete control of Panjshir province, the last area in Afghanistan held by rebel forces, says the group’s spokesman, Zabihullah Mujahid.

Pictures on social media on Monday showed Taliban members standing in front of the gate of the Panjshir provincial governor’s compound.

There was no immediate word from Ahmad Massoud, the leader of the opposition group resisting Taliban forces.

Earlier on Monday, the last anti-Taliban forces in Afghanistan acknowledged suffering considerable battlefield losses and called for a ceasefire, as a top United States diplomat flew to Qatar to try and handle the chaotic aftermath of the US withdrawal.

The National Resistance Front (NRF) proposed in a statement “that the Taliban stop its military operations in Panjshir … and withdraw its forces”.

“In return, we will direct our forces to refrain from military action,” said the statement, according to a report by the AFP news agency.

The NRF includes local fighters loyal to Massoud, the son of the famous anti-Soviet and anti-Taliban commander Ahmad Shah Massoud, as well as remnants of the Afghan military that retreated to the Panjshir Valley.

The group said separately in a tweet on Sunday that spokesman Fahim Dashty, a well-known Afghan journalist, and General Abdul Wudod Zara had been killed in the latest fighting.

The NRF has promised to fight the Taliban but also said it was willing to negotiate with the group. But initial contact did not lead to a breakthrough.

The Panjshir Valley is famed for being the site of resistance to Soviet forces in the 1980s and the Taliban in the late 1990s, but observers have said the NRF is struggling.

Bill Roggio, the managing editor of the US-based Long War Journal, on Sunday said while there was still a “fog of war”, with unconfirmed reports the Taliban had captured multiple districts, “it looks bad”.

Former Vice President Amrullah Saleh, who is holed out in Panjshir alongside Ahmad Massoud, has warned of a humanitarian crisis, with thousands “displaced by the Taliban onslaught”.

The Taliban is yet to finalise their new government after rolling into Kabul three weeks ago.

Afghanistan’s new rulers have pledged to be more “inclusive” than during their first stint in power, which also came after years of conflict, first the Soviet invasion of 1979, and then a bloody civil war.

They have promised a government that represents Afghanistan’s complex ethnic makeup.

Women’s freedoms in Afghanistan were sharply curtailed under the Taliban’s 1996-2001 rule.

This time, women will be allowed to attend university as long as classes are segregated by sex or at least divided by a curtain, the Taliban’s education authority said in a lengthy document issued on Sunday.

But female students must also wear an long robe and face veil, as opposed to the even more conservative burqa mandatory under the previous Taliban rule.

As the Taliban comes to grips with their transition from armed uprising to government, it is facing a host of challenges, including humanitarian needs for which international assistance is critical.

UN humanitarian chief Martin Griffiths has arrived in Kabul for several days of meetings with the Taliban leadership, which has promised to help.

“The authorities pledged that the safety and security of humanitarian staff, and humanitarian access to people in need, will be guaranteed and that humanitarian workers – men and women – will be guaranteed freedom of movement,” a statement from UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.

The Taliban spokesman tweeted that the group’s delegation assured the UN of cooperation.

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